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Thinking about getting into Android TV? You've got options: tons of TVs from companies like TCL and Sony run on Android. There aren't quite as many choices if you want a great streaming device that runs Android TV — especially when compared to Roku and Amazon's Fire TV — but there's still variety. Here, we've assembled a list of our picks for the best Android TV boxes, plus a couple of recommendations for new screens with Android TV built right in.

Editors choice

8.50 / 10

Nvidia's tubular Shield TV has been available since 2019, so it's not the newest "box" on this list — but we still think it's the best Android TV device for most people today. Thanks to its custom Tegra X1+ chipset (and despite its two gigs of RAM), it's super snappy. It also plays nice with more audio and video standards than you can shake a stick at, including Dolby Vision and Atmos, and has some of the most natural upscaling you'll see in any streaming device. Nvidia's also traditionally offered legendary software support for its Shield TV devices, too. It's expensive at $150, though, and it's got HDMI 2.0b — which doesn't mean much now, but could present an issue when content that takes full advantage of HDMI 2.1 is more prevalent (whenever that is). If those things don't bother you, the Shield TV is an excellent pick.

Specifications
  • Operating System: Android TV 11
  • Downloadable Apps: Yes
  • Resolution: 4K, 1080p
  • Ports: HDMI 2.0b, MicroSD, Gigabit Ethernet
  • Supported Audio Codecs: Dolby Digital, Dolby Digital Plus, Dolby Atmos, Dolby TrueHD, DTS:X (pass-through), DTS Core
  • RAM/storage: 2GB/ 8GB
  • Connectivity: Wi-Fi 802.11ac (Wi-Fi 5), Bluetooth 5.0
  • Price: $150
  • CPU: Nvidia Tegra X1+
Buy This Product
Nvidia Shield TV (2019)

9.00 / 10

The Chromecast with Google TV is a great option if you're put off by the Shield TV's high price. At 50 bucks, it also offers broad AV standard support, and unlike the Shield, it has HDMI 2.1. It's only got eight gigs of storage, though, which will be a problem if you want to use lots of apps. It's also only got one USB port, which is used for power — so if you want to connect accessories like SD cards or hard drives, you'll need both a compatible USB hub and a 45-watt (or higher) Power Delivery charger. Still, it's generally simple to use and doesn't cost much, and being a first-party Google product, it should enjoy long software support. It's a great starter Android TV device.

Specifications
  • Operating System: Android TV 12
  • Downloadable Apps: Yes
  • Resolution: 4K, 1080p
  • Ports: HDMI out, USB-C
  • Supported Audio Codecs: DTS, Dolby Digital+, Dolby Audio, Dolby Atmos
  • RAM/storage: 2GB/ 8GB
  • Connectivity: Wi-Fi 802.11ac (Wi-Fi 5), Bluetooth 4.2
  • Price: $50
Buy This Product
Chromecast with Google TV
Premium pick

9.00 / 10

The Shield TV Pro is the fancier version of the base-model "tube." It has all the same features, plus extra RAM and storage, USB ports, and Plex integration — the Shield itself can act as a server that you can stream content from to other devices. At $200, it's very obviously not for most people; this is an enthusiast option through and through. If you were thinking about the regular Shield TV, though, the added perks might be worth it for you.

Specifications
  • Brand: Nvidia
  • Operating System: Android 11
  • Downloadable Apps: Yes
  • Resolution: 4K
  • Ports: HDMI 2.0, gigabit Ethernet, 2x USB 3.0, power
  • RAM/storage: 3GB/16GB
  • Connectivity: Bluetooth, Wi-Fi
  • Display: Dolby Vision, HDR 10
  • Audio: Dolby Atmos, Dolby Digital Plus
  • Integrations: Amazon Alexa, Google Assistant, SmartThings
  • CPU: Nvidia Tegra X1+
Buy This Product
Nvidia Shield TV Pro
Best value

8.75 / 10

If you're looking for something really cheap, Walmart's Onn Android TV 4K is 30 stinkin' bucks — and frequently discounted, to boot. Performance is fine, but build quality is what you'd expect at the price. And while it does support 4K video, it lacks Dolby Vision certification — so it's only got HDR10, HDR10+, and HLG. It also doesn't have Atmos support. But again, it's $30, so it's hard to judge it too harshly. If you want the cheapest Android TV solution possible, this is the one for you.

Specifications
  • Brand: Onn
  • Operating System: Android TV
  • Downloadable Apps: Yes
  • Resolution: 4K
  • Ports: HDMI output, microUSB for power only
  • RAM/storage: 2GB/ 8GB
  • Connectivity: Bluetooth 4, Wi-Fi
  • Display: HDR
  • Audio: Dolby Audio
Buy This Product
Onn Android TV 4K

8.00 / 10

The Chromecast with Google TV (HD) has everything we like about 2020's Chromecast with Google TV, minus the 4K resolution and Dolby Vision HDR. Instead, it tops out at 1080p and offers HDR10 and HDR10+. If you're looking for a streaming dongle to use on a sub-4K display, this is a great pick, but consider springing for the previous generation if you think you might upgrade your TV in the near future. Your next television will almost certainly be 4K.

Specifications
  • Operating System: Android TV 12
  • Downloadable Apps: Yes
  • Resolution: 1080p, 720p
  • Ports: USB-C
  • Supported Audio Codecs: Dolby Digital, Dolby Digital Plus, Dolby Atmos via HDMI passthrough
  • RAM/storage: 1.5GB/ 8GB
  • Connectivity: Wi-Fi 802.11ac (Wi-Fi 5), Bluetooth
  • Price: $30
  • Integrations: Google Home
  • CPU: Amlogic 805X2
Pros
  • Quick-enough performance
  • Simple, nice looking UI
  • Great remote with Google Assistant control
Cons
  • 8GB of storage might not be enough
  • Only $20 less expensive than the 4K version
Buy This Product
Chromecast with Google TV (HD)

8.50 / 10

Say you're in the market for a television that has Android TV built in. In that case, the Hisense U7G line is a great place to start. It comes in 55-, 65-, and 75-inch sizes, supports 4K/120Hz playback, and works with standards like Dolby Vision and Atmos. It's also very well regarded: gave it an 8.1/10 for general use (and it scored especially high marks for gaming). Pricing starts at $850 for the 55-inch model, but it's often on sale for hundreds less.

Specifications
  • Screen Size: 55", 65", 75"
  • Operating System: Android TV
  • Panel Type: LED (VA)
  • Resolution: 4K
  • Refresh rate: 120Hz
  • Price: Starting at $850
Buy This Product
Hisense U7G Series TV

8.25 / 10

Sony's X85J TVs are a great mid-range option. They're available in sizes from 43" all the way up to 85" and pack tons of desirable features, including built-in Google TV, support for standards like HDR10 and Dolby Vision, four HDMI 2.1 ports, and variable refresh rates up to 120Hz for supported content. While these sets don't have the perfect black levels of OLED TVs, praises the X85J line's contrast and black uniformity.

Note that despite an MSRP that starts at $750 for the 43-inch model, like most TVs, these go on sale regularly — it's not unusual to see them going for hundreds under sticker price, so keep an eye out for deals.

Specifications
  • Screen Size: 43", 50", 55", 65", 75", 85"
  • Operating System: Google TV
  • Panel Type: LED
  • Resolution: 4K
  • Refresh rate: 120Hz
  • Price: Starting at $750 (MSRP)
Buy This Product
Sony X85J TV

What's the best Android TV box for you?

A new streaming device is a great way to add smarts to your non-connected TV or revitalize a smart TV that's started to feel slow. All the options in this list have access to the same video streaming services, so the right one for you depends on your specific needs.

If you want a fast, smooth experience complete with all the modern A/V standards, the Nvidia Shield TV will be a good fit for you — provided you've got $150 to drop on a streaming box. The Shield TV Pro costs 50 bucks extra for some added functionality. If you're not sure whether you should choose the regular or the Pro, go with the less expensive model; you'd know if you had any use for the Pro features.

The Chromecast with Google TV is a fine starter device at $50. Google TV is a version of Android TV with Google's newest design and recommendation system centered around the Google TV app and Google Assistant. Compared to the Shield TV, it's not as powerful, which means navigating the UI will feel slower. It also has limited storage space at just eight gigabytes, and to connect a USB storage device, you'll need a USB-C hub. Still, as long as you only use a handful of apps, you shouldn't have any trouble.

Walmart's Onn TV 4K is only $30, so it's a great choice for spare bedrooms and the like — just be aware it doesn't support some advanced features like Dolby Atmos surround sound. There's also the $30 Chromecast with Google TV (HD), which is almost identical to the 4K Chromecast with Google TV, except it tops out at 1080p and doesn't offer Dolby Vision HDR. Looking to save money on content, too? Several streaming services offer the best value for your buck, such as YouTube, Netflix, Peacock, and more.